Repainting artworks

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Traces of slavery at the Frans Hals Museum
Traces of slavery at the Frans Hals Museum Traces of slavery at the Frans Hals Museum



One of the paintings that will be provided with additional information from 1 July: Frans Post, Brazilian Landscape, 1656, Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem. Photo: Stefan Rustenburg

Interactive Gallery Talks, every Sunday at the Frans Hals Museum. Photo: Stefan Rustenburg

One of the paintings that will be provided with additional information from 1 July: Buhlebezwe Siwani, Mnguni, 2019, Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem. Photo: Stefan Rustenburg

Location

Hof

Duration

± minutes

Partners

Stichting Keti Koti Haarlem

Ineke Mok en Dineke Stam

Duration

± minutes

Extra information accompanying artworks

From 1 July to 3 September, Frans Hals Museum offers extra information to accompany the permanent presentation. Read our alternative texts and explore new perspectives on the city’s art. Perspectives that examine the inequality and power imbalance inherent in colonialism as well as the heritage of slavery. On Sundays, trained museum guides are available to discuss the subject in interactive Gallery Talks.

One of the paintings that will be provided with additional information from 1 July: Frans Post, Brazilian Landscape, 1656, Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem. Photo: Stefan Rustenburg

Colonialism and slavery

July 1 marks the 150th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Suriname and the Caribbean territories of the kingdom of the Netherlands. A formal end to slavery had been legislated ten years earlier, in 1863. Yet the impact of slavery on Dutch society has remained visible and palpable ever since in inequality and (unseen) discrimination.

Many of the works at the Frans Hals Museum date from the period after 1600, when the foundations of the Dutch colonial empire were being laid. Is the economic history, and the violence and slavery that accompanied it, visible in the museum? How do today’s artists respond?

Together with Keti Koti Haarlem and Ineke Mok and Dineke Stam, researchers and authors of the recently published volume on Haarlemmers en de slavernij (Haarlemmers and slavery), the Frans Hals Museum is taking a new look at the collection. The results of our collaboration will be incorporated into our permanent presentation and our museum programmes.

Interactive Gallery Talks, every Sunday at the Frans Hals Museum. Photo: Stefan Rustenburg

Tangible memories of a painful past

The Frans Hals Museum presents art that is part of the colonial history of the Netherlands and Haarlem. These works hold tangible memories of the painful past that we address in this project. From 1 July to 3 September, we have linked twelve artworks and objects connected to slavery and colonial history to texts that enable you to discover more about this history and its continuing impact on society.

One of the paintings that will be provided with additional information from 1 July: Buhlebezwe Siwani, Mnguni, 2019, Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem. Photo: Stefan Rustenburg

The book Haarlemmers en de slavernij All activities related to slavery and colonial Haarlem More information about Keti Koti Haarlem

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